Stick 'em with the Pointy End!

Swords and other weapons

9 notes

I want to sincerely apologize for the lack of activity lately. I’ve recently joined this blog. But I’ve only made two posts. Life has been hectic lately…

But I’m planning on posting a few more reviews of my own personal collection, along with a wish list giving the details I like about some swords on the market.

I’m also thinking about making a few posts on what to look for when buying a sword.

- Captain Fantastyk.

878 notes

art-of-swords:

The Sword of Mercy
Maker: Zandona Ferrara (bladesmith active circa 1600); Rundell Bridge & Rundell (jeweller)
Dated: early 17th century
Medium: steel, iron, copper, wood, the scabbard of leather, velvet, silver gilt
Measurements: 96.5 x 19 cm
Acquirer: Charles I, King of Great Britain (1600-49), when King of Great Britain (1625-49)
Provenance: probably created for the coronation of Charles I in 1626
The sword has a gilt-iron hilt with a wooden, wire-bound grip, and a broad steel blade, truncated about 2.5 cms from the original point, with a “running wolf” mark inlaid in copper. It is presented with its velvet-covered leather scabbard with gold embroidery and silver-gilt mounts.
This sword, known as the Sword of Mercy or the Curtana, is one of three swords which are carried unsheathed, pointing upwards, in the coronation procession. This sword is accompanied by two swords of Justice (Sword of Temporal Justice and Sword of Spiritual Justice). 
The practice of carrying three swords, representing kingly virtues, dates back to the coronation of Richard the Lionheart in 1189. This sword, representing Mercy, has had its tip removed so that it no longer functions as a weapon, although in origin it was constructed in the same way as a practical sword.
The three swords were made for the coronation of Charles I in 1626 and then placed with the regalia in Westminster Abbey. Together with the coronation spoon, these three works were the only pieces to survive the Civil War and Interregnum untouched.
It is not known whether they were used in the coronation procession of Charles II, but they have certainly been used since 1685. A new scabbard was made for the sword in 1821 for the coronation of George IV.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

The Sword of Mercy

  • Maker: Zandona Ferrara (bladesmith active circa 1600); Rundell Bridge & Rundell (jeweller)
  • Dated: early 17th century
  • Medium: steel, iron, copper, wood, the scabbard of leather, velvet, silver gilt
  • Measurements: 96.5 x 19 cm
  • Acquirer: Charles I, King of Great Britain (1600-49), when King of Great Britain (1625-49)
  • Provenance: probably created for the coronation of Charles I in 1626

The sword has a gilt-iron hilt with a wooden, wire-bound grip, and a broad steel blade, truncated about 2.5 cms from the original point, with a “running wolf” mark inlaid in copper. It is presented with its velvet-covered leather scabbard with gold embroidery and silver-gilt mounts.

This sword, known as the Sword of Mercy or the Curtana, is one of three swords which are carried unsheathed, pointing upwards, in the coronation procession. This sword is accompanied by two swords of Justice (Sword of Temporal Justice and Sword of Spiritual Justice).

The practice of carrying three swords, representing kingly virtues, dates back to the coronation of Richard the Lionheart in 1189. This sword, representing Mercy, has had its tip removed so that it no longer functions as a weapon, although in origin it was constructed in the same way as a practical sword.

The three swords were made for the coronation of Charles I in 1626 and then placed with the regalia in Westminster Abbey. Together with the coronation spoon, these three works were the only pieces to survive the Civil War and Interregnum untouched.

It is not known whether they were used in the coronation procession of Charles II, but they have certainly been used since 1685. A new scabbard was made for the sword in 1821 for the coronation of George IV.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

34 notes

Historical weaponry

kultofathena:

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Kult of Athena has a wide range of historic swords and other weaponry for experienced collectors and those just starting out. From Viking weapons like those pictured above, or Japanese weapons like katanas.

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We even have historic replicas based on real weapons such as our Ulfberht sword based on the legendary Nordic smith. Swords from different times have been found marked with the name.

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Check out our site and follow us for more posts.

547 notes

art-of-swords:

Studies on the Ulfberht Swords
Since I got a couple of messages asking about these swords, with help from James G. Elmslie (thank you!), have some academic reading about them. Before you start glorifying, please read…
Studies Of Viking Age Swords: Metallography and Archaeology
by Eva Elisabeth Astrup & Irmelin Martens
The paper is a comment on Alan Williams’ investigation “A Metallurgical Study of some Viking Swords” published in Gladius XXIX. Williams’ paper comprises metallurgical inventigations of 44 Viking Age swords, all with the ‘ULFBERHT’ inscriptions. Such investigations, made by a well qualified metallurgist are essential to archaeology.
Unfortunately, this one has some serious limitations. In order to give a good descriptions of the quality of the swords-blade, samples showing at least the section through both the edge and the central part of the blade are necessary.
This is mostly not the case in Williams’ investigations, and he gives insufficient information about his samples. Other weak points are his group division and his interpretation of the production area for the blades containing high-carbon steel.
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

The Ulfberht sword blades reevaluated 
by Anne Stalsberg 
Readers of archaeological literature about Viking Age weapons are familiar with the male name ‘Vlfberht’ which is welded onto Viking Age sword blades. The name is in the archaeological litetrature also written ‘Ulfberh’; V and U were used interchanganly for the semi-vowel [ w ], but the sword blade signature is with one wingle expection “written” <V>. 
‘Ulfberh’ is regarded as a Frankish blacksmith and the name itself is Frankish, from the lower Rhine Area, and it is generally supposed that his sword blades were traded from the Frankish Realm to pagan Europe. During preparations for the publication of the Norwegian-Russian Sword Project it struck me that these “axioms” need a renewed discussion.
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © Gladius | Jenny Rita Blog

art-of-swords:

Studies on the Ulfberht Swords

Since I got a couple of messages asking about these swords, with help from James G. Elmslie (thank you!), have some academic reading about them. Before you start glorifying, please read…

Studies Of Viking Age Swords: Metallography and Archaeology

  • by Eva Elisabeth Astrup & Irmelin Martens

The paper is a comment on Alan Williams’ investigation “A Metallurgical Study of some Viking Swords” published in Gladius XXIX. Williams’ paper comprises metallurgical inventigations of 44 Viking Age swords, all with the ‘ULFBERHT’ inscriptions. Such investigations, made by a well qualified metallurgist are essential to archaeology.

Unfortunately, this one has some serious limitations. In order to give a good descriptions of the quality of the swords-blade, samples showing at least the section through both the edge and the central part of the blade are necessary.

This is mostly not the case in Williams’ investigations, and he gives insufficient information about his samples. Other weak points are his group division and his interpretation of the production area for the blades containing high-carbon steel.

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

The Ulfberht sword blades reevaluated 

  • by Anne Stalsberg 

Readers of archaeological literature about Viking Age weapons are familiar with the male name ‘Vlfberht’ which is welded onto Viking Age sword blades. The name is in the archaeological litetrature also written ‘Ulfberh’; V and U were used interchanganly for the semi-vowel [ w ], but the sword blade signature is with one wingle expection “written” <V>. 

Ulfberh’ is regarded as a Frankish blacksmith and the name itself is Frankish, from the lower Rhine Area, and it is generally supposed that his sword blades were traded from the Frankish Realm to pagan Europe. During preparations for the publication of the Norwegian-Russian Sword Project it struck me that these “axioms” need a renewed discussion.

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © Gladius | Jenny Rita Blog

1,184 notes

art-of-swords:

The Sword of Spiritual Justice
Maker: Zandona Ferrara (bladesmith active circa 1600) Creation Date: 
Dated: early 17th century
Medium: iron, steel, copper, wood with scabbard of leather, velvet, silver gilt
Measurements: 116.8 x 99.7 cm
Acquirer: Charles I, King of Great Britain (1600-49), when King of Great Britain (1625-49)
Provenance: probably supplied for the coronation of Charles I in 1626
The sword has a gilt-iron hilt with a wooden, wire-bound grip, the escutcheons of the guard triangular and rather sharply pointed, with a steel blade, struck with the maker’s mark at the top and incised further down with a “running wolf” mark, and with a velvet-covered scabbard with gold embroidery and silver-gilt mounts.
This sword, known as the Sword of Spritual Justice, is one of three swords which are carried unsheathed, pointing upwards, in the coronation procession. This sword is accompanied by the Sword of Temporal Justice and the Sword of Mercy (with a blunted tip). The practice of carrying three swords, representing kingly virtues, dates back to the coronation of Richard the Lionheart in 1189.
The three swords were made for the coronation of Charles I in 1626 and then placed with the regalia in Westminster Abbey. Together with the coronation spoon, these three works were the only pieces to survive the Civil War and Interregnum untouched. It is not known whether they were used in the coronation procession of Charles II, but they have certainly been used since 1685. A new scabbard was made for the sword in 1821 for the coronation of George IV.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

art-of-swords:

The Sword of Spiritual Justice

  • Maker: Zandona Ferrara (bladesmith active circa 1600) Creation Date: 
  • Dated: early 17th century
  • Medium: iron, steel, copper, wood with scabbard of leather, velvet, silver gilt
  • Measurements: 116.8 x 99.7 cm
  • Acquirer: Charles I, King of Great Britain (1600-49), when King of Great Britain (1625-49)
  • Provenance: probably supplied for the coronation of Charles I in 1626

The sword has a gilt-iron hilt with a wooden, wire-bound grip, the escutcheons of the guard triangular and rather sharply pointed, with a steel blade, struck with the maker’s mark at the top and incised further down with a “running wolf” mark, and with a velvet-covered scabbard with gold embroidery and silver-gilt mounts.

This sword, known as the Sword of Spritual Justice, is one of three swords which are carried unsheathed, pointing upwards, in the coronation procession. This sword is accompanied by the Sword of Temporal Justice and the Sword of Mercy (with a blunted tip). The practice of carrying three swords, representing kingly virtues, dates back to the coronation of Richard the Lionheart in 1189.

The three swords were made for the coronation of Charles I in 1626 and then placed with the regalia in Westminster Abbey. Together with the coronation spoon, these three works were the only pieces to survive the Civil War and Interregnum untouched. It is not known whether they were used in the coronation procession of Charles II, but they have certainly been used since 1685. A new scabbard was made for the sword in 1821 for the coronation of George IV.

Source: Copyright © 2014 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

90 notes

captnfantastyk:

And last, but certainly not least. The biggest and by far most expensive sword in my personal collection.

The Darksword Armory two handed Templar sword.

Sitting at 48 inches long. Or up to my elbow when I’m standing up straight at 6’1” and two inches wide at the base of the blade.

This thing is a MONSTER.

And yet It’s well balanced and light enough (3 lbs 9 oz.) that I barely struggle to handle it with ONE hand!

This is not a utility piece or an everyday tool. This is the definition of a war sword. A dealer of destruction.

And though this is just my review of it. You can find more of the history behind the design here: https://darksword-armory.com/products-page/medieval-swords/two-handed-templar-medieval-sword-1339/

79 notes

captnfantastyk:

Pictured above is the Hanwei banshee.
Yet another very durable “less expensive” ($170 on kultofathena) sword. A design based on the Burmese Dha And Thai Krabi. One of the neat things I liked is the unique scabbard. With a built in locking mechanism to keep the sword from slipping out. And the rings on the sides to clip onto the included belt.
All in all it feels like a very “modern day” sword. With the black leather wrapped handle and the black matte finish on the scabbard.

captnfantastyk:

Pictured above is the Hanwei banshee.

Yet another very durable “less expensive” ($170 on kultofathena) sword. A design based on the Burmese Dha And Thai Krabi. One of the neat things I liked is the unique scabbard. With a built in locking mechanism to keep the sword from slipping out. And the rings on the sides to clip onto the included belt.

All in all it feels like a very “modern day” sword. With the black leather wrapped handle and the black matte finish on the scabbard.