Stick 'em with the Pointy End!

Swords and other weapons

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artofswords:

#Vikings #VikingSword

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9th Century Single Edged Viking Sword

Editor’s Note: Text below translated by Google from the original German.

Powerful, broad-edged blade. Short, slightly ridged guard. Conical Angel with a flat, slightly gegratetem on the outer edge of the pommel. The perforated knob on both sides of the Angel, lost the top half of the two-part knob. Quillons and pommel to the show pages with well-preserved, whole-area Tauschierung of fine, parallel bronze wires. The upper and lower sides of each covered in fine sheet bronze. Get the sheet at the pommel only remnants. Length 88 cm.

Condition: III Limit: 8000 EURO

Read more: http://sword-site.com/thread/996/century-single-edged-viking-sword#ixzz3FAmOUdvm

Sword-Site.Com - The World’s Largest Online Sword Museum!

http://www.sword-site.com

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Sword of the Freemasons
Throughout history, swords have been used at every great event and have become imbued with great symbolism. This unique Freemason Masonic Sword contains a great many of the symbols used in the craft, particularly the compass and set-square, the plumb line and the hammer, the sacred book and the eye of the Supreme Being and the five-pointed star inscribed with the capital “G” of the Great Architect. “WHAT YOU MAKE MAKES YOU”.  The Freemasonry Masonic Sword by Marto of Toledo Spain has a tempered stainless steel blade. The hilt is cast metal with 24K gold plated inlays, depicting symbols of the masonic tradition. The hand grip is inlaid with blue velvet, while the disk shaped pommel frames a five-pointed star intertwined with a “G” in 24K gold. This is a high quality product made in Toledo Spain by Marto which you can proudly display with honor.
Overall: 47-1/2”
Blade: 35” long, 2” wide, 1/4” thick
Wt: 6-1/2 lbs

Sword of the Freemasons

Throughout history, swords have been used at every great event and have become imbued with great symbolism. This unique Freemason Masonic Sword contains a great many of the symbols used in the craft, particularly the compass and set-square, the plumb line and the hammer, the sacred book and the eye of the Supreme Being and the five-pointed star inscribed with the capital “G” of the Great Architect. “WHAT YOU MAKE MAKES YOU”.  The Freemasonry Masonic Sword by Marto of Toledo Spain has a tempered stainless steel blade. The hilt is cast metal with 24K gold plated inlays, depicting symbols of the masonic tradition. The hand grip is inlaid with blue velvet, while the disk shaped pommel frames a five-pointed star intertwined with a “G” in 24K gold. This is a high quality product made in Toledo Spain by Marto which you can proudly display with honor.
  • Overall: 47-1/2”
  • Blade: 35” long, 2” wide, 1/4” thick
  • Wt: 6-1/2 lbs

(Source: museumreplicas.com)

Filed under Sword of the Freemasons sword Freemasons Masons Masonic Knights Templar

97 notes

Thuận Thiên (順天, Heaven’s Will) was the mythical sword of the Vietnamese King Lê Lợi, who liberated Vietnam from Ming occupation after ten years of fighting from 1418 until 1428. Lê Lợi then proclaimed himself king of the newly established Lê Dynasty. According to legend, the sword possessedmagical power, which supposedly made Lê Lợi grow very tall. When he used the sword it gave him the strength of a thousand men, and the legend is often used to justify Lê Lợi’s rule over Vietnam. The sword has been associated with Lê Lợi since the early phase of the Lê Dynasty.
Legend
Lê Lợi revolted in 1418 against the Ming Dynasty, who had invaded and occupied Vietnam in 1407. Initially the military campaign against the Chinese was only moderately successful. While Lê Lợi was able to operate in his home province of Thanh Hóa, for the first 2–3 years, he was unable to muster the military forces required to defeat the Ming army in battle. As a result, he waged a guerrilla campaign against the large and well organized Chinese army. According to legend, to help Lê Lợi, a local God, the Dragon King (Vietnamese: Long Vương) decided to lend his sword to Lê Lợi. But there was a catch; the sword did not come straight to him in one piece. It was split into two parts: a blade and a sword hilt.
First, in Thanh Hóa province, there was a fisherman named Lê Thận, who was not related to Lê Lợi in any way. One night, his fishing net caught something heavy. Thinking of how much money he would get for this big fish, he became very excited. However, his excitement soon turned into disappointment when he saw that his catch was a long, thin piece of metal which had somehow become entangled to the net. He threw it back into the water, and recast the net at a different location. When he pulled the net in, the metal piece had found its way back into the net. He picked it up and threw it far away with all its strength. The third time the fishing net came up, the same thing happened, the metal piece was once again caught in the net. Bewildered, he brought his lamp closer and carefully examined the strange object. Only then did he notice that it was the missing blade of a sword. He took the blade home and not knowing what to do with it, put it in the corner of his house.
Some years later, Lê Thận joined the rebel army of Lê Lợi, where he quickly rose in ranks. Once, the general visited Lê Thận’s home. Lê Thận’s house lacked lighting, so everything was dark. But as though it was sensing the presence of Lê Lợi, the blade at the corner of the house suddenly emitted a bright glow. Lê Lợi held up the blade and saw two words manifesting before his very eye: Thuận Thiên (Will of Heaven). With Lê Thận’s endorsement, Lê Lợi took the blade with him. One day, while on the run from the enemy, Lê Lợi saw a strange light emanating from the branches of a banyan tree. He climbed up and there he found a hilt of a sword, encrusted with precious gems. Remembering the blade he found earlier, he took it out and placed it into the hilt. The fit was perfect. Believing that the Heaven had entrusted him with the great cause of freeing the land, Lê Lợi took up arms and rallied people under his banner. For the next few years, the magic sword brought him victory after another. His men no longer had to hide in the forest, but aggressively penetrated many enemy camps, captured them and seized their granaries. The sword helped them push back the enemy, until Vietnam was once again free from Chinese rule. Lê Lợi ascended the throne in 1428, ending his 10-year campaign, and reclaimed independence for the country.
One year after ascending the throne, Lê Lợi was on a dragon boat cruising around Hồ Lục Thủy (Green Water Lake), directly in front of his palace. When they came to the middle of the lake, a giant turtle with a golden shell (Kim Qui) emerged from under the water surface. Lê Lợi ordered the captain to slow down, and at the same time looked down to see that the magic sword on his belt was moving on its own. The golden turtle advanced toward the boat and the king, then with a human voice, it asked him to return the magic sword to his master, Long Vương (Dragon King), who lived under the water. It suddenly became clear to Lê Lợi that the sword was only lent to him to carry out his duty, but now it must be returned to its rightful owner, lest it corrupt him. Lê Lợi drew the sword out of its scabbard and lobbed it towards the turtle. With great speed, the turtle opened its mouth and snatched the sword from the air with its teeth. It descended back into the water, with the shiny sword in its mouth, and for a long period a flickering light was said to have been seen from beyond the muddled depths of the lake. From then on, people renamed that lake to Hồ Gươm (Sword Lake) or Hồ Hoàn Kiếm (Lake of the Returned Sword).

Thuận Thiên (順天, Heaven’s Will) was the mythical sword of the Vietnamese King Lê Lợi, who liberated Vietnam from Ming occupation after ten years of fighting from 1418 until 1428. Lê Lợi then proclaimed himself king of the newly established Lê Dynasty. According to legend, the sword possessedmagical power, which supposedly made Lê Lợi grow very tall. When he used the sword it gave him the strength of a thousand men, and the legend is often used to justify Lê Lợi’s rule over Vietnam. The sword has been associated with Lê Lợi since the early phase of the Lê Dynasty.

Legend

Lê Lợi revolted in 1418 against the Ming Dynasty, who had invaded and occupied Vietnam in 1407. Initially the military campaign against the Chinese was only moderately successful. While Lê Lợi was able to operate in his home province of Thanh Hóa, for the first 2–3 years, he was unable to muster the military forces required to defeat the Ming army in battle. As a result, he waged a guerrilla campaign against the large and well organized Chinese army. According to legend, to help Lê Lợi, a local God, the Dragon King (Vietnamese: Long Vương) decided to lend his sword to Lê Lợi. But there was a catch; the sword did not come straight to him in one piece. It was split into two parts: a blade and a sword hilt.

First, in Thanh Hóa province, there was a fisherman named Lê Thận, who was not related to Lê Lợi in any way. One night, his fishing net caught something heavy. Thinking of how much money he would get for this big fish, he became very excited. However, his excitement soon turned into disappointment when he saw that his catch was a long, thin piece of metal which had somehow become entangled to the net. He threw it back into the water, and recast the net at a different location. When he pulled the net in, the metal piece had found its way back into the net. He picked it up and threw it far away with all its strength. The third time the fishing net came up, the same thing happened, the metal piece was once again caught in the net. Bewildered, he brought his lamp closer and carefully examined the strange object. Only then did he notice that it was the missing blade of a sword. He took the blade home and not knowing what to do with it, put it in the corner of his house.

Some years later, Lê Thận joined the rebel army of Lê Lợi, where he quickly rose in ranks. Once, the general visited Lê Thận’s home. Lê Thận’s house lacked lighting, so everything was dark. But as though it was sensing the presence of Lê Lợi, the blade at the corner of the house suddenly emitted a bright glow. Lê Lợi held up the blade and saw two words manifesting before his very eye: Thuận Thiên (Will of Heaven). With Lê Thận’s endorsement, Lê Lợi took the blade with him. One day, while on the run from the enemy, Lê Lợi saw a strange light emanating from the branches of a banyan tree. He climbed up and there he found a hilt of a sword, encrusted with precious gems. Remembering the blade he found earlier, he took it out and placed it into the hilt. The fit was perfect. Believing that the Heaven had entrusted him with the great cause of freeing the land, Lê Lợi took up arms and rallied people under his banner. For the next few years, the magic sword brought him victory after another. His men no longer had to hide in the forest, but aggressively penetrated many enemy camps, captured them and seized their granaries. The sword helped them push back the enemy, until Vietnam was once again free from Chinese rule. Lê Lợi ascended the throne in 1428, ending his 10-year campaign, and reclaimed independence for the country.

One year after ascending the throne, Lê Lợi was on a dragon boat cruising around Hồ Lục Thủy (Green Water Lake), directly in front of his palace. When they came to the middle of the lake, a giant turtle with a golden shell (Kim Qui) emerged from under the water surface. Lê Lợi ordered the captain to slow down, and at the same time looked down to see that the magic sword on his belt was moving on its own. The golden turtle advanced toward the boat and the king, then with a human voice, it asked him to return the magic sword to his master, Long Vương (Dragon King), who lived under the water. It suddenly became clear to Lê Lợi that the sword was only lent to him to carry out his duty, but now it must be returned to its rightful owner, lest it corrupt him. Lê Lợi drew the sword out of its scabbard and lobbed it towards the turtle. With great speed, the turtle opened its mouth and snatched the sword from the air with its teeth. It descended back into the water, with the shiny sword in its mouth, and for a long period a flickering light was said to have been seen from beyond the muddled depths of the lake. From then on, people renamed that lake to Hồ Gươm (Sword Lake) or Hồ Hoàn Kiếm (Lake of the Returned Sword).

(Source: Wikipedia)

Filed under Thuận Thiên sword Thuan Thien Heaven's Will Lê Lợi Vietnamese Vietnam Asian Lê Dynasty

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artofswords:

#MedievalHistory #Sword #History

English Medieval Broadsword of Oakeshott Type XII w/ An Unusually Well Recorded Personal History

AN EXTREMELY RARE LATE MEDIEVAL BROADSWORD WITH EARLIER VIKING BLADE AND BEARING THE ARMS OF THE DE BOHUN FAMILY, EARLS OF HEREFORD AND ESSEX


THE BLADE MID-11th CENTURY, THE GUARD AND POMMEL 13th/14th CENTURY

With tapering double-edged fullered blade, iron cross-guard slightly swelled at each tip, short tang, and flattened iron wheel pommel inlaid with a copper shield on each side bearing the de Bohun coat of arms, each shield retaining traces of original gilding and enamelled inlay

27 7/8 in. (70.7cm.) blade

A runic inscription is clearly visible within one fuller

The blade has been slightly shortened and reprofiled to a tapering point, the original Viking profile ending with a rounded point. The fuller on each side has been partially filled towards the tip by molten iron to shorten the groove in proportion to the tapering tip.

The 1319 Will of Sir Humphrey De Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex (1276-1322), held in the Public Records Office, makes specific mention of four swords in the inventory of personal property of the Earl:

"iiij. Espeies. Lun des armes le dit Counte, lantre de Saint George et le tierce Sarziney, le quarte de Guerre”

A translation from old French is “Four swords, one with arms of said earl, the second of Saint George, and the third of ‘Sarziney’, the fourth of war”. It is the first mentioned of these four swords that is of present interest. 

The narrative surrounding this sword begins in 1066 and a kinsman (or possibly god father) of William The Conqueror, one Humphrey De Bohun (a literal translation being Humphrey ‘with the beard’). Humphrey, depicted on the Bayeux Tapestry seated at the banquet table of Bishop Odo, accompanied William on his campaign gaining the lordship of Taterford in Norfolk for his troubles. It is known that Humphrey De Bohun fought at the battle of Senlac, better known as Hastings in October 1066 where the army of King Harold Godwinson was defeated by the Normans. Less than three weeks earlier, Harold had defeated the Viking army of the Norwegian King Hardrada and his own brother Tostig Godwinson at Stamford Bridge in Yorkshire. 

Whilst it cannot be proved, it is not at all inconceivable that the blade of the present sword was captured or taken as a trophy by de Bohun at Hastings and was later remounted to become a family sword. The English army who faced William in Sussex would conceivably be armed with some Viking weapons, especially having routed the Norwegians in Yorkshire there would have been plenty available to be pressed into service against this new threat. A Viking sword with an identical runic inscription was discovered by Dr. Jorma Leppäaho near Jamsa in central Finland during an excavation of a mid-11th century Viking burial, with the find first being published in the mid-1960s in a Finnish archaeological publication. The sword, originally found curled, is housed in the Suomen Kansallismuse in Helsinki, and has only come to the attention of a wider audience since publication in Swords of the Viking Age in 2002. A second excavated Viking sword with identical runic inscription, believed to have been found in the banks of the river Derwent (in the very close vicinity to the site of the battle at Stamford Bridge), is held in a private British collection. With both these other swords retaining precious metal inlay to a greater or lesser degree to their runic inscriptions, it is entirely possible that the present blade was equally as lavishly decorated.

Moving forward several generations to Sir Humphrey de Bohun, 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex, we find the family at the very centre of English society and Sir Humphrey Constable of England. A seasoned campaigner in Scotland having served both Edward I and Edward II, he and his wife Elizabeth (daughter of Edward I) were entrusted as custodians of Elizabeth de Burgh, queen to King Robert I of Scotland (Robert Bruce) who was captured by the English following Robert’s 1306 rebellion, taking of the Scottish crown and subsequent self-imposed exile. By June 1314 and out of favour with the King, not for the first time, Sir Humphrey together with the Earl of Gloucester, Sir Gilbert De Claire, shared command of the English army raised to fight King Robert of Scotland. 

The battle of Bannockburn, celebrating its 700th anniversary this year, was a resounding victory for Scotland. Sir Humphrey was in the thick of the battle, witnessed his young nephew Henry de Bohun fall victim to King Robert’s axe, and joined the retreat after it became clear on the second day of fighting that victory belonged to the Scots. He was taken prisoner at Bothwell Castle and eventually ransomed for the safe return of King Robert’s queen, Elizabeth, his daughter Marjorie Bruce, two bishops and other prominent Scots captives. The present sword, whilst not being a war sword, would have served as a clear badge of identity with its gold and enamelled coat of arms on the pommel and eminently more practical as a side arm around camp when not mounted and armed for battle. It is therefore entirely possible that this sword was present at Bannockburn in June 1314 if not actually on the field of battle.

The 4th Earl of Hereford and Essex met with a particularly gruesome end at the battle of Boroughbridge in March 1322, a demise that has found favour with a younger modern audience through the Horrible Histories series of books. Having joined the Earl of Lancaster in revolt against Edward II, Sir Humphrey was leading a charge across the bridge on foot when a pikeman concealed beneath the bridge thrust his weapon through the planks allegedly skewering Sir Humphrey through the anus, his agonising and vocal death turning the attack into a retreat. 


The sword and the heraldic device have been together for around the last fifty years, first in the Corrigan Collection and subsequently with the vendor. The whereabouts of the sword prior to Corrigan’s ownership is not known, but the mention of a family sword bearing the de Bohun arms in Sir Humphrey’s Will of 1319 and the use of a mid-11th century Viking blade makes for an interesting train of thought potentially linking significant events of British history from the Vikings, Hastings and Bannockburn through this object. A series of x-rays which accompany the sword and heraldic device support the age of the items and show no modern repairs.

For further reading please see:

Ian Peirce, Swords of the Viking Age, 2009 ed., p. 136

The Archaeological Journal, Vol. II, London, 1846,T.H. Turner, The Will of Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford and Essex, with Extracts from the Inventory of his Effects, A.D. 1319-1322, pp. 339-349

The American Historical Review, April 1896, Melville M. Bigelow, The Bohun Wills, pp. 414-435

Looking for a great all rounder Type XII Medieval Sword? Check out CAS Hanwei’s Tinker Pearce Early Medieval Sword through Sword-Site Deals: sword-site.com/thread/840/tinker-single-sword-sharpened-athena

For more information on Oakeshott Type XII swords see this extract of Ewart Oakeshott’s Records of the Medieval Swordsword-site.com/thread/676/oakeshott-type-xii-defined-ewart

See also this article in the Daily Mail (UK): Is this England’s Most Unlucky Sword?

Read more: http://sword-site.com/thread/911/oakeshott-sword-unusually-recorded-history#ixzz3ETuwGnGG

Sword-Site.Com - The World’s Largest Online Sword Museum

http://www.sword-site.com

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darksword-armory:

10th century, European, probably Scandinavian. The skillfully decorated hilt and blade indicate that this sword was carried by a warrior of high rank, perhaps a Viking chieftain or a Frankish nobleman. The braided copper wires on the pommel may represent an earlier Scandinavian custom of tying a talisman to a sword hilt. The pattern-welded blade was forged of intertwined rods of steel and iron, a technique that produced a tough, resilient blade with a distinctive swirling pattern on its surface.
posted from  https://darksword-armory.com/

darksword-armory:

10th century, European, probably Scandinavian. The skillfully decorated hilt and blade indicate that this sword was carried by a warrior of high rank, perhaps a Viking chieftain or a Frankish nobleman. The braided copper wires on the pommel may represent an earlier Scandinavian custom of tying a talisman to a sword hilt. The pattern-welded blade was forged of intertwined rods of steel and iron, a technique that produced a tough, resilient blade with a distinctive swirling pattern on its surface.

posted from  https://darksword-armory.com/